/ub/ - Überhengst

Becoming better


Welcome to the new code.
If you want to see the latest posts from all boards in a convenient way please check out /overboard/
Note: JS is required to be able to post, but I am working on a system where that won't be needed.

Name
Email
Subject
By clicking New Reply, I acknowledge the existence of the Israeli nuclear arsenal.
Comment
0
Select File / Oekaki
File(s)
Password (For file and/or post deletion.)

download (16).jpg
8569b8645c1ccd99e562715637294f2c.jpg
P_20170527_144933_vHDR_On.jpg
P_20170325_140850_vHDR_Auto.jpg
P_20170520_095044_vHDR_On.jpg
Outdoors/wilderness
Anonymous
g8fkI
?
No.709
Reminder that if you don't go on a hike, backpack trip or climb a mountain every now and then you can never be /ub/. Bonus points for doing it miles away from a road.

Also post pics of places you've conquered if you do these things and anything related to outdoors survival/activities.

Your goal should be to climb Denali. First pic.
Anonymous
p/VKI
?
No.960
1028
IMG_20180210_082900.jpg
60km walking is the farest I got in one day as of yet.
Didn't get too far from the city, but I did got into a weird rural area, it was cool but I didn't have a tent so I couldn't continue.
I'm planning to go full woods one of these days.
Anonymous
Grbnc
?
No.1028
1029
>>960
Do it nigger. Pro tip 3 out of two of those are my pics.
Anonymous
xwxSo
?
No.1029
>>1028
Yeah I'm planning on traveling to the congo soon, expect to hear from me and see a congo flag then
Gonna kill some niggers
Anonymous
UkqUz
?
No.1041
1043
I've never been much of an /out/ guy because there is not much nature around where I live but I am planning to change that.
Any advince for a newb? Good boots must be very important so what should I look for?
Anonymous
Jxqsr
?
No.1043
1059 1068 1119
>>1041
I think mostly it depends on where you are planing on hiking, and what season you are in. If summer I would opt for some light shoes for easier travel. What is most important is to find some that fits your feet well. Don't think too much that they have to be hiking boots. Also setting out on a long trip with brand new shoes can lead to problems. Shoes needs to be broken in before they become comfortable. Also bring some blister plasters as they will be a godsend if you get blisters.
Then you should think of something to make a fire with; lighter is usually a good option (no need to overcomplicate things). Water is also important and depending on availability (lakes, rivers, springs, etc) bring what you think you will need to get to a place to replenish your supply (probably better way to say this). Then some shelter an one man tent can be good to have, here also season and climate will mostly set some guidelines for what you need. If it is lots of mosquitoes a tent or at least some mosquito net is good to have during sleep.
But best advice I think is to start out with short trips (no longer than that you comfortably can walk home without effort). Set up tent and camp out for the night. This way you will quickly discover if there is anything you should have brought with you. This way you can determine when you feel ready to go further and further. Without the risk of tiring yourself out trying to get home for vital supplies or other reasons.
>I think every outdoors-man started out camping in the backyard of their house when they were kids
Anonymous
UkqUz
?
No.1059
1061
>>1043
Thanks for your reply. Will search for some possible destination.

One problem is that making fire is illegal here almost anywhere and anytime so is there a way to reduce/cover the smoke?

As for the boots I just ask because I only have sneakers and work boots and both seem like a bad idea for long hikes and forests and mountains.
Anonymous
Jxqsr
?
No.1061
1062 1119
>>1059
For cooking you could use a Primus stove of some kind, they usually are allowed even if campfire is not.
For the short trips start out with the sneakers. As long as you are comfortable walking in them they should be fine IMO. For long hikes during winter Valenki is as good as any. You will for sure stay warm in them.
Mostly what you should remember when taking long hikes is to take off your shoes when you take a break and also you should swap between socks if they get wet (from sweat or from walking in water). Keeping your feet dry will serve you well in the long run.
You can look at it like this. In the old days they used leather "socks" filled with straw as footwear; sneakers are usually better than that. So comfort over style when it comes to footwear. Sure more rugged footwear will allow you to do a bit more rugged walking, but to start out use what you are comfortable with that you have today and start with short weekend trips out into the wilderness. This will give you a feel for what you will need and what type of terrain you will encounter.

Also I have to disclose that I am in no way an wealth of information on footwear, but the way I see it is that you can get far with what you already have. And as long as you have dry socks you have what you need. I have been walking in the forest and mountain with the shoes I use daily.
Anonymous
UkqUz
?
No.1062
>>1061
Thanks for your advice! Maybe getting in touch with nature or away from civilisation could do me some good.
Anonymous
OsM+M
?
No.1068
1069
>>1043
Water is one thing I want to ask you about.
There are some rivers but there is no marine life in them because all the shit they pour into it (oils, chemicals, waste, pesticides...) so this is a no no.

Small streams are an option but what about lentic waters? Meme or not but fish shit and fuck in that. Bakteria and contamination and the likes. That can't be safe. I don't want to shit out my guts in the wild.
Anonymous
Jxqsr
?
No.1069
1119
>>1068
If source of clean fresh water is a problem you can either boil water you find to sanitize it, or use a LifeStraw or similar to filter the water. I'm blessed with living in a place where clean water is not hard to find so I have not put too much thought into that. Another potential source is collecting rain water if possible, possibly boil that too just to be 100% safe, but I would think rain water is safe untreated. But naturally I would not make rainwater my primary source due to its irregular occurrences.
Anonymous
EPnnX
?
No.1072
1120
What do you carry with you when you are out?
Anonymous
EPnnX
?
No.1092
1093
Finaly got my tent and I am ready for my first trip.
Here is what I am planning to pack.

Tent and bedroll
Med suplies, phone and knife (you never know also photos)
Water and food (dried meat and nuts)
Knickers, socks and a towel and a shirt
wet wipes
One beer

wish me luck
Anonymous
Jxqsr
?
No.1093
1510101014134.png
>>1092
Best of luck on your adventure.
Have Fun.
Anonymous
EPnnX
?
No.1095
1098
first 1.jpg
first 3.jpg
first 5.jpg
first 6.jpg
first 7.jpg
So I had my first 2day trip and I learned a couple of things.
Volume is a far greater problem than weight.
Despite the volume a sleeping pad is something worth bringing.
Forest ground can be really hard.
I should downgrade the stuff I brought into smaller packages so I can bring more stuff.
I need a bigger backpack.
Wet wipes are okay for one overnight trip but you run through them quickly.
Water is the limiting factor.
Anonymous
EPnnX
?
No.1096
1098
first 14.jpg
first 21.jpg
sorry for the shitty camera
Anonymous
EPnnX
?
No.1097
And while your faster on streets they fuck up your feet more thay the softer offroad grounds.
Anonymous
URufX
?
No.1098
>>1095
>>1096
Looks really nice, and I hope you had fun. Mornings with mist and dew are simply superb to wake up to, looks like perfect comfy.
Anonymous
EPnnX
?
No.1105
1120
Deer-Tick-Engorged-Female-2.jpg
1491359515971.gif
How to deal with these disgusting little fucks? I have been lucky so far mainly because I stayed on the main path but once I get more comfortable I want to go in deeper and there these monsters are.

I hate these fucks so god damn much! I can deal with almost any animal but if there is one thing I hate it is these motherfuckers and internal parasites like worms.
Anonymous
Grbnc
?
No.1119
IMG_20160520_1402016_rewind.1.jpg
IMG_20150704_1720417_rewind.1.jpg
IMG_20150705_1008404_rewind.1.jpg
Been away for a while, really glad to see people in my thread.
Great advice here.
>>1043
>>1061
>>1069
Ill just give some of my opinions on the things discussed to help resurrect the site.
>boots/footwear
Find what works for you. I rock shitty boots issued from basic training or my running shoes kek. Most guys hate the boots but they work for me and if im not going super far then I might just go with sneakers. In the past I would train my feet to be barefoot on runs and short hikes. Im gonna get back to doing this more. Tough feet are a really good asset, just gotta keep good footwear for cold or hot weather and sharp things or bugs. You can make your feet as tough as shoes.

>fires/cooking
Like previously stated many places do not allow fires. Ive been using a Coleman stove my brother got me for Christmas for when I cant make a fire. I love that thing. My father uses a military issue stove from the 70s still with no problems. Good equipment can last you forever. Another reason to have a stove is for when you are unable to start a fire due to environment and not just regulations. I learned this the hard way by going up a mountain under the rain the whole day. It was too damp to start a fire and got cold really fast. Thank god I had a tent and sleeping bag.

>water
I carry the little purification tablet you can buy at most cmaping stores in America. Idoine crystals are good to use too, not sure if they are sold as much anymore. I usually boil my water and purify it and I live in an area with pristine streams. If it is coming straight out of the mountain than I'll usually drink it as is.
Anonymous
Grbnc
?
No.1120
1121
REI DOME 2.jpg
Gregory Stout.jpg
Skinner.jpg
Alice pack.jpg
>>1072
>What do you carry with you when you are out?
Food like jerky, nuts, energy bars. I sometimes buy actual camping food but I also really like to bring out summer sausage, bread, swiss cheese and even tomatoes. Some Swiss miss cocoa is the tits to.
Water
Extra clotes (socks socks socks)
Stove
Book(s)
My little telescope
Fire stuff
Multi tools
Medicals stuff if I want more weight
Flash lights or solar lights (more than one)
Tent
Sleeping bag
Dry bags
Shovel if ive got it
Trash bags
My knife
A flask of liquor if I feel like it
My pipe and tobacco

I use the Rei Dome 2 which fits two people comfortably, warm and super light. I now use the Gregory Stout Backpack, I used to use the Alice pack and sometimes do still. Great old thing but too wide sometimes.I just got the Benchmade Skinner for various things, i would also bring a cheap beater knife especially if you arent use to them.
>>1105
Yeah tics and other little niggers are annoying. Just make sure to check your body for anything every now and then. If you get bit by a spider use something like a credit card to scrap as much of the venom off. Use a card also for bee stings and such so you don't squeeze all the poison inside. Tweezers and a few other hygiene items are good to bring too. If you have a bite that you're worried about mark it by using a sharpie to make a circle. Monitor it, you dont want any purple/dark discoloration or red looking bullseye marks. Also good to know what you are allergic too if you are, thank god I seem to be good for most ants, bees and other things.

Anonymous
EPnnX
?
No.1121
1122
>>1120
I need a bigger backpack which can fit a tent and a sleeping back
Anonymous
I/aPE
?
No.1122
1128
>>1121
If your backpack has straps you can strap them to the outside of the back (it is often more convenient this way rather than trying to stuff them inside the backpack).
Anonymous
Grbnc
?
No.1128
>>1122
This is good but if its raining you'll need a good poncho. Also I forgot to mention to always bring a poncho.